Verbum supernum prodiens

The Word, come forth from heaven’s height,
Yet leaving not the Father’s right,
And going out in working strength,
To His life’s evening comes at length.

His rivals have His death trap laid—
For His disciple has betrayed—
But first, the Food of life, Himself,
He handed over to the Twelve.

He gave Himself to them as Food
In twofold form of Flesh and Blood,
That He might meet their total need:
Their human twofold substance feed.

When born, He gave Himself as Friend;
As Food, when dining at the end;
As Ransom in His sacrifice;
As King, He gives Himself as prize.

O Victim, Who by dying saves,
Who paths through heaven’s portals paves,
Our enemies are close arrayed:
Give us Your strength and timely aid

Eternal glory ever be
To You, O One and Trinity,
And give us life that has no end
When to our homeland we ascend. Amen.

Comments?

An office hymn for Palm Sunday

Celsae salutis gaudia

The joy of heaven’s saving ways
Let faithful earth its anthems raise,
For Jesus, Ransomer of all,
Now holds the prince of death in thrall.

The young of palm and olive trees,
The people pave the road with these.
Their voices jubilantly grow:
“Hosanna David filio!”

Then let us all with running feet
Make haste our high great Prince to meet,
And melodies of glory sing,
Our palms of gladness offering.

By blessed gifts may He upraise
Our walking over slip’ry ways,
Our journeys safe, that all our ranks
May pay to Him our debt of thanks.

Be glory to the Father done,
And likewise to His only Son,
And to the Holy Spirit praise
Forever, unto endless days. Amen.

Translation c. 2021 Kathleen Pluth

Comments?

Versus Psalmorum et Canticorum now available in hardcover

One of the handy books CMAA offers for use in the liturgy is Versus Psalmorum et Canticorum, which provides Vulgate psalm verses for use at the Introit or at Communion, pointed for the appropriate psalm tones.  The Liber Usualis and the Graduale Romanum 1961, the common books for extraordinary-form Masses, do not contain any psalm verses for the Communion antiphon, and only one for each Introit, so if your schola needs to sing those antiphons and extend them with additional verses, this is a useful volume.  We’ve offered it for some years in softcover and are now introducing a hardcover version, as requested by a reader.

Along with the new binding option, there’s a new cover for both the soft- and hardcover versions, which you can see here next to the old edition.

For ordering information, see the page at the CMAA Shop.
 

Comments?

Bible in a Year

It’s wonderful to see the internet, for all its faults, being apostolically employed for the new evangelization.

The Chosen, a rather hip life of Christ complete with an on-the-spectrum tax collector is filming its second season and crowdfunding its third.

Meanwhile, Fr. Mike Schmitz  is setting podcast box office records with his Bible in a Year series from Ascension Press. Every day a new podcast is dropped, each containing passages from Scripture, prayer, and commentary.

The effects of the podcasts are Catholic, unifying: they bring together people, writings, events–and us.

In a time when so much seems locked down, it’s great to notice once again that the Word of God is not chained.

Seas and Rivers, Bless the Lord

O seas and rivers, bless the Lord,
The maker of all things.
Today creation is restored:
O bless him, all you springs.

Behold: the Son of God baptized
In waters He makes new.
The Father’s voice above the skies–
Bless Him, you rain and dew.

All natures, let His grace increase–
O Jordan, fill the earth!
In Him the Father is well pleased.
In Him, the world’s rebirth.

Copyright © 2005 CanticaNOVA Publications. Duplication restricted.
Meter: CM (8.6.8.6) Suggested tune: Winchester Old, or others:
Azmon Richmond Saint Flavian
Dundee Saint Agnes Saint Magnus
Graefenburg Saint Anne Saint Peter
Land of Rest Saint Columba Saint Stephen
Newman

SMIA Spring Courses

The Sacred Music Institute of America (SMIA) will offer three 10-week online courses during the Spring 2021 semester, which begins on 18 January.

Each course includes ten video lectures, plus weekly opportunities to ask questions and gain additional experience through live Zoom sessions. For more information on the courses, as well as the Institute’s certification tracks for church musicians and chant training program for clergy, visit www.sacredmusicinstitute.org.

Chant II (taught by Dr. William Mahrt): A ten-week intermediate course in Gregorian chant for singers, directors, and lovers of the liturgy and its music. It will presume a rudimentary knowledge of reading Gregorian notation, and will proceed from the reading and singing of chants in Latin from the antiphons of the Divine Office to the chanted propers of the Mass.

Review of notation and Latin pronunciation will be the foundation for the discussion of textual and musical the chants: mode, tessitura, contour, density, text expression, and co-ordination with liturgical action. Beginning with the simpler chants, psalm antiphons, musical, liturgical, and spiritual aspects of each genre will be studied in turn: introits, communions, offertories, graduals, alleluias, and tracts, with emphasis on the processional propers.

Some chants of the Ordinary of the Mass will be included as well. Aspects of the liturgical year will be addressed, with an emphasis upon the upcoming Holy Week.

History of Sacred Music (Taught by Emily Lapisardi): A ten-week course which will be taught by Emily Lapisardi, director of music at the Catholic Chapel at the United States Military Academy (West Point, NY).

This ten week course provides a survey of the historical role of music in worship from its roots in the Old Testament to the present day, exploring landmark repertoire within the framework of turning-points in ecclesiastical history. While the class will focus primarily on Christian music in the western world, cross-cultural influences will also be explored.

Music Theory II (Taught by Emily Lapisardi): This course builds upon the fundamental skills and concepts explored in Theory I; therefore, some prior knowledge of the subject matter is required.

Topics include: harmonic analysis, seventh chords, harmonization of melodies, transposition, modulation to closely related keys, non-harmonic tones, modes and neumes, basics of counterpoint, and musical forms.

Tuition for each course is $850. Register now by visiting the SMIA website.