A Marian Mass in Spanish (Colloquium Mass audio)

Again this year the Sacred Music Colloquium included a Mass celebrated in Spanish: this time a votive Mass of Our Lady of Guadalupe, with wonderful music of the Spanish Renaissance, on Thursday, July 4.

The Mass setting was La misa Caça by Cristobal de Morales, and the Mass included motets by Guerrero and de la Torre.  The propers were sung in new plainchant adaptations by Janet Gorbitz and Jennifer Donelson.  Music for the Mass can be viewed in the colloquium repertoire book at pages 103-134, except for a motet by Cornelius Verdonck of the Spanish Netherlands, which was a late substitution.

Photos by Charles Cole are on-line at New Liturgical Movement, and here are audio excerpts:

    1. Prelude: Bach, Fantasia super “Komm, heiliger Geist” (BWV 651)
    2. Processional interlude
    3. Introit: Un gran señal
    4. Kyrie: Morales: La misa Caça
    5. Gloria: Morales, La misa Caça
    6. Psalm: Tú eres la honra de nuestro pueblo (Mahrt/Cabezon)
    7. Alleluia, Dichosa tu
    8. Offertory: Dios te salve, Maria
    9. Interlude
    10. Motet: Verdonck, Ave gratia plena
    11. Interlude
    12. Sanctus/Benedictus: Morales, La misa Caça
    13. Padre nuestro
    14. Agnus Dei: Morales, La misa Caça
    15. Communion: Nos ha hecho
    16. Interlude
    17. Motet: Guerrero, O celestial medicina!
    18. Interlude
    19. De la Torre: Adoremoste, Señor
    20. Vierne: Toccata from Suite Nr. 2, op. 53:

Thanks to the anonymous attendee who posted a video of portions of the Mass on-line; the above image is a screenshot from it.

Colloquium Mass Audio: July 3: Feast of St. Thomas, Apostle

On the third day of the CMAA Sacred Music Colloquium, Fr. James Richardson offered Mass in the Ordinary Form on the feast of St Thomas the Apostle, at the Cathedral Basilica of Ss Peter and Paul in Philadelphia. The Latin propers were sung with Gregorian Mass IV; among the the motets sung were Quia vidisti me, Thoma by Hassler, Mitte manum by Isaac and O salutaris hostia by Anerio. Organist Michael Garrepy performed works by Mendelssohn and Bach. Photos by Charles Cole are on-line at New Liturgical Movement, and here are audio excerpts:

1. Prelude: Mendelssohn: Op. 37, Nr. 2 (partial recording)

2. Processional

3. Introit: Mihi autem

4. Kyrie, Mass IV (Cunctipotens genitor Deus)

5. Gloria IV

6. Gradual: Nimis honorati sunt

7. Alleluia: Gaudete justi

8. Credo III

9. Offertory: In omnem terram

10. Hassler: Quia vidisti me

11. Sanctus IV

12. Pater noster

13. Agnus Dei IV

14. Communio: Isaac: Mitte manum tuam

15. Anerio: O salutaris hostia

16. Bach: Kyrie (Gott Heiliger Geist), BWV 671

Dom Alcuin Reid on “liturgical integrity”

On Wednesday, July 3, liturgical scholar Dom Alcuin Reid, prior of the Monastère Saint-Benoît in the diocese of Fréjus-Toulon, France, gave the second plenary lecture at CMAA’s Sacred Music Colloquium, at the Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul in Philadelphia. His talk on authority in liturgy recalls the teaching of Pope Pius XII in Mediator Dei that

“Liturgy is a constitutive element of the holy and living Tradition.” The liturgy, the liturgical rites themselves, are an intrinsic part of the handing on of the faith received from the apostles. They are not mere decoration or ornament. The rites and prayers that have developed in the life of the Church are sacred vessels which bring apostolic tradition to us. Thus they are privileged sacramentals worthy of profound respect.

That is why Catholic liturgy is sacred. That is why Catholic liturgy is not that which any individual or group ‘likes’ to do, but is what we do ecclesially, in accordance with what is handed on to us in tradition. That is why the Sacred Liturgy enjoys a theological objectivity and cannot be altered without the greatest of prudence and due proportionality.

Against a subjectivism that would make the liturgy depend on “whatever the priest wants” or whatever this or that particular pope wants, according to personal opinions, Reid proposes principles of “liturgical integrity”. A text of his lecture appears in Catholic World Report.

First audio from the Colloquium: Tuesday, July 2

Here are some sample recordings from the Sacred Music Colloquium held in Philadelphia this month.

Tuesday, July 2

In the morning, Sr. Maria Kiely, OSB, an instructor in Greek at the Dominican House of Studies in Washington, presented a talk on the six vesper hymns long associated with the name of St. Gregory the Great: Lucis creator optime, Immensae caeli conditor, Telluris ingens conditor, Caeli Deus sanctissime, Magnae Deus potentiae, and Plasmator hominis Deus. The themes of the six hymns reflect the unfolding of creation in the six days of the Genesis account. (approx. 60 min.)

Tuesday afternoon, after the first rehearsals of the various choirs that formed for the week, a votive Mass of the Holy Angels was celebrated in English. Here are a few excerpts (please note that these are my amateur recordings, so there is incidental noise):

Procession (improvisation by Michael Olbash, organ):

Introit (plainchant by Fr. Samuel Weber, OSB):

Responsorial Psalm (George Elvey, arr. Mahrt):

Communion (plainchant by Fr. Samuel Weber, OSB):

Motet (Richard Farrant: “Call to Remembrance”):

Motet (Richard Terry: “Richard de Castre’s prayer to Jesus”):

Postlude (Bach: “Fantasia in G”, BWV 572)

Repertoire for the Colloquium Masses

Colloquium week in Philadelphia

Basilica of Sts. Peter and Paul, Philadelphia

The Sacred Music Colloquium is underway at the cathedral in Philadelphia, and today had the most splendid event of the week, a sung Mass with a performance of the Requiem,  the Missa pro defuncto archiepiscopo Sigismundo by Michael Haydn (1737-1806), the younger brother of F.J. Haydn.

The various portions of the Mass were performed by three choirs under the direction of Charles Cole, David Hughes, and Timothy McDonnell. For the occasion, a generous donor made it possible for CMAA to include an orchestra with numerous performers from the Baltimore Symphony.

Charles Cole, choir, and orchestra rehearsing for the Requiem

Charles Cole, choir, and orchestra rehearsing for the Requiem

 

 

Here is one portion of the Mass, the Tract Absolve, Domine, performed by the women’s schola composed of colloquium participants under the direction of Mary Ann Carr Wilson:

Summer music and liturgy events

Still making plans for the summer? Here are some of the educational opportunities being offered in sacred music and liturgy:

  • The Sacred Music Colloquium of the Church Music Association of America: a six-day program including fully sung Masses in English, Latin, and Spanish, providing an experience of the liturgy with its full ceremonial and sacred music. Participants join choirs under expert instructors to learn and sing Gregorian chant and choral polyphony. This year the Colloquium Masses will be held at the cathedral in Philadelphia July 1-6, and the polyphony choirs will be directed by Timothy O’Donnell, Charles Cole, David Hughes, and MeeAe Cecilia Nam.
  • Chant courses sponsored by the Church Music Association of America: in the week preceding the Colloquium, two chant programs will be presented on the campus of Duquesne University in Pittsburgh: our “Chant Intensive” program under conductor Jeffrey Morse, and the first level of the “Laus in Ecclesia” cantor training program under Br. Mark Bachmann OSB of Clear Creek Abbey. Graduate credit is available for both programs through Duquesne.
  • Michael Alan Anderson is directing a week-long workshop on chant and polyphony presented by Eastman School of Music, to be held in New York City June 10-14.
  • Janet Coxwell, David Woodcock, and Andrew Carwood will be directing the Early Music Academy Boston program July 27-Aug 2, to be held at Assumption College in Worcester, Mass., studying works of Palestrina, Clemens, and Guerrero.
  • Patrick Torsell will direct a chant camp for children and youth 7-18 years of age in Harrisburg, PA, June 24-28; a video on-line has more information.
  • St. Joseph’s Seminary in New York will offer graduate-level courses in sacred music this summer, on site and on-line; the on-line classes start June 3, and on-site programs start July 22: descriptions are available on the Musica Sacra Forum.
  • A retreat for church musicians will be offered August 16-20 in Sleepy Eve, MN: a description of the program with liturgies offered according to the Usus Antiquior of the Roman rite is offered in this PDF file, and registration information is at the event’s Facebook page.
  • Schola Cantus Angelorum is presenting its seventh summer liturgy conference in Spokane May 28-31 on the campus of Gonzaga University. Speakers include Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone, Bishop Thomas Daly, Bishop Robert Vasa, Msgr. Andrew Wadsworth, Dr. Peter Kwasniewski, Nathan Schmiedicke, Msgr. Richard Huneger, Canon Lawyer Magdalen Ross, Rev. Theodore Lange, Rev. Gabriel Mosher OP, Douglas Schneider, Alex Begin and Enzo Selvaggi. More information is at https://sacredliturgyconference.org/
  • The Monastère Saint-Benoît of the Diocese of Fréjus-Toulon is presenting the sixth annual Sacra Liturgia Summer School, in English, at La Garde-Freinet in France, August 3-16.
  • Composer-conductor Paul Jernberg is presenting a Sacred Music Workshop for clergy, musicians, and laity June 24-29 on the beautiful campus of Northeast Catholic College in Warner, New Hampshire. (unfortunately cancelled)
  • St. Vitus Parish (FSSP) in Los Angeles is presenting its Sacred Music Symposium June 24-28 under the direction of Jeffrey Ostrowski.
  • Daniel Saulnier, former director of the paleography workshop at Solesmes, is presenting an introductory workshop on Gregorian chant August 6-9 as part of the Choralies festival at Vaison-la-Romaine.
  • The Gregorian Institute of Canada will present its summer conference August 8-11 at the Abbey of St.-Benoit-du-Lac in Quebec, with musicologist Juan Carlos Asensio Palacios presenting on Hispanic (“Mozarabic”) plainchant.