The Latin Mass comes to Laredo, Texas! 

Beginning this coming Sunday, December 16th at 3:00 pm, the Society of St. Padre Pio is proud to announce that extraordinary form liturgies will be offered once a month at 3 pm on the Sunday after the third Saturday of each month. Mass will be held at Christ the King Parish with Msgr. James Harris as celebrant.

It is possible to offer this liturgy in the extraordinary form because of the Motu Proprio Summorum Pontificum, from July 7, 2007 by Pope Benedict XVI.

Music will be provided by the St. Cecilia Choir, with Rogelio Senties as director. If you’re in the area, make plans to join them and support their effort to make this form of the Mass available to those in the region.

Details:
December 16, 2018, 3:00 pm
Christ the King Parish
1105 Tilden
Laredo, TX 78040
Ph: 956-723-4267

Comments?

Newly published: Graduale Parvum: Introits

A new book of Mass propers in English and Latin has appeared from our friends in England: Fr. Guy Nicholls of the Birmingham Oratory has published Graduale Parvum: Introits.

The book contains entrance chants on simple melodies, much in the style of the Graduale Simplex and ICEL’s Roman Missal ordinary chants. Here’s an example:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The book has some attractive advantages. The melodies are freely adapted from the authentic Gregorian chants in the Graduale Romanum and often preserve their melodic outline, so they’re a step up for choirs that have used more formulaic English adaptations. In addition, the English texts are all from standard, well-known sources approved for liturgical use by the Holy See: the ICEL Roman Missal and the Revised Grail Psalter. They’re fully notated, including the psalm verses, in attractive, readable chant notation.

American readers can get the book from the CMAA Shop web site, a little easier and slightly cheaper than ordering it from the UK.

Incidentally, in 2002, Fr. Nicholls spoke at the CMAA Sacred Music Colloquium  about the propers and the task of promoting them; the talk has an introduction by Jeffrey Tucker, and included some examples from the book’s draft at the time, which the gathered participants sang.

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Cantus sororum: medieval Brigittine chants

Some time ago we got a note from the makers of a recent book of chants published in Finland.

Cantus sororum is a collection of transcribed medieval chants sung by Brigittine nuns, edited by musicologist Hilkka-Liisa Vuori. If I understand right, the chants were associated with the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

Some samples from an album by duo Vox Silentii are on the net:
Transplantatur ab Jericho
Benedicamus in laudem Patris

An article about the material is on-line at the site of Vox Silentii, and the book is available from the editor or from the Catholic Information Center in Helsinki.

You can read the book’s introduction here.

Comments?

Two Spanish Chant Conferences – Washington DC area

In April, the United States Bishops will publish the Third Edition of the Roman Missal in Spanish. To encourage seminarians, clergy, congregations and choir directors to learn the music, the Zipoli Institute will be offering a two-day conference in Spanish Sacred Music:

Fri, Apr 27 – Seminarians and Clergy

 

Sat, Apr 28 – Congregations and Choirs

Immediately following these conferences, and a mere 10 minute drive, Archbishop Alexander Sample will be celebrating a Solemn Pontifical High Mass on April 28 in the upper church at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C.  The Paulus Institute is sponsoring this event as the 10th anniversary of Summorum Pontificum.


Proclamation of Easter and Moveable Feasts for EF and OF – 2016 Edition With Dates!

The proclamation of the date of Easter and the other moveable feasts on Epiphany is one of the many things that was a practical necessity in time of old, but is kept within liturgical use (similar to candles providing light at Mass). It is something that any parish can use Epiphany Sunday after the gospel (in the ordinary form).

There are two scores in the file, depending on which day your Diocese celebrates the Ascension.

Edit (12:39pm CST): Thanks to Veronica Brandt for the EF score as well.

Edit (2:29pm CST): Thanks to Andrew Motyka for the OF modern notation score.

Ordinary Form: Download a PDF or a practice Mp3 (courtesy NPM)

Ordinary Form (modern notation): Download a PDF

Extraordinary Form: Download a PDF

‘Stop Asking “Is the music religious?” Ask Rather, “Is the music liturgical?”

A column by Hilary Cesare at Ignitum Today about what so many Catholic are missing in their worship, (hint, it begins with “prop” and ends with “ers,”) and some suggestions about how they might get started.

Have You Been Missing Out on a Centuries-Old Catholic Musical Tradition?
Some of the most divisive conversations amongst Catholics today arise over music at Mass. Most arguments revolve around the style of music or the instrumentation. However, these arguments generally don’t focus much on the texts of the music. The majority of us have grown up in parishes that are unaware of or lacking an essential part of Church’s musical heritage: The Propers. We should stop asking “Is the music religious?” but rather, “Is the music (and its text) liturgical?” The Church assigns specific chants/texts to each day of the liturgical year, just as she assigns certain readings & psalms to each day of the year. The General Instruction of the Roman Missal says that these scriptural, liturgical texts (called “the Propers”) are the ideal and most desirable thing to be sung at Mass.
We are accustomed to the readings, responsorial psalm, and Alleluia verse changing each week in the Missalette. The scriptural texts of the Mass Propers also change daily and allow us to more fully participate in the liturgical day being celebrated. There are three times when the Propers are sung at a Novus Ordo Mass

(A little quibble, the Gradual can be sung, of course.)
(Oh, and I don’t know Hilary but I’ve chosen, among other labels, “youth” because… well, to me everyone is.)

New In-Depth Youtube Series on Accompanying Gregorian Chant

An organ score from the Nova Organi Harmonia

Recently, a user of the CMAA Forum began creating a tutorial on the methods of providing organ accompaniment to gregorian chant which many have found useful. His first video can be found below, and the rest can be found here. If this interests you, make sure to subscribe, so that you can continue to receive his new videos as they are released.

While there are collections of scores for this purpose, it is ultimately much more useful and flexible if an organist can learn the methods for improvising accompaniment, which this series attempts to teach.