Tournemire in Pittsburgh

This November, the city of three rivers is to be favored with a full performance of L’Orgue Mystique, the chant-inspired suite of works by Charles Tournemire. Organist Richard Spotts will be performing from the collection on November 4 and again daily from November 9 to 17 at various churches in the Pittsburgh area.

Ann Labounsky, professor of organ at Duquesne University, appeared with Mr. Spotts in a short video about the event. (I hope it’s visible to everyone.)

Comments?

Colloquium Day 3: All Together

Before I write about Wednesday, let me follow up with a little more information about events that took place on Tuesday:

Thanks to Joel Morehouse (of the Setnor School of Music, Syracuse) for posting additional photos of the Mass at St. John the Apostle Church (the pro-cathedral) at our sister site New Liturgical Movement, where Joel is also a contributor on parish music and liturgy.

At the CMAA members meeting on Tuesday, general manager Janet Gorbitz announced that the 2017 Sacred Music Colloquium will be held in St. Paul, Minnesota, from June 19 to 24, and one of the Masses will be offered at the historic St. Agnes Church in remembrance of Monsignor Richard Schuler, the long-time pastor and musician, co-founder of the CMAA, and editor of the journal Sacred Music.

In addition, Janet announced that registration is open for CMAA’s 2017 Winter Sacred Music event, to be held at the Cathedral of St. Paul in Birmingham, Alabama next January.

On Wednesday, Christ Church Episcopal Cathedral in St. Louis opened their doors and their organ loft to Prof. Ann Labounsky (Duquesne) who presented a breakout session on repertoire for pianists making the transition to the king of instruments:

And here is a view from the transept of Christ Church Cathedral:

At the end of the afternoon, Holy Mass at the Shrine of St. Joseph:

After Holy Mass, colloquium attendees came together in front of the Shrine for a group photo:

(Photo credits: Rene Zajner)

A tour of Dutch church organs

A collection of classic organ broadcasts has come on-line recently, thanks to the former Dutch radio service Radio Nederland Wereldomroep. RNW was a major international broadcaster for 50 years, and it produced many series of music programs, sent on vinyl phonograph records to be transmitted by local stations around the world.

Here is a set of performances from 1968 under the series title “Netherlands Church Organs of the 18th Century”. Each program is about 28 minutes long.

My favorite so far is #2: Noordbroek. What’s yours?

New In-Depth Youtube Series on Accompanying Gregorian Chant

An organ score from the Nova Organi Harmonia

Recently, a user of the CMAA Forum began creating a tutorial on the methods of providing organ accompaniment to gregorian chant which many have found useful. His first video can be found below, and the rest can be found here. If this interests you, make sure to subscribe, so that you can continue to receive his new videos as they are released.

While there are collections of scores for this purpose, it is ultimately much more useful and flexible if an organist can learn the methods for improvising accompaniment, which this series attempts to teach.

“Josef Gabriel Rheinberger and the Reform of Catholic Church Music” by Paul Weber

Congratulations to CMAA member and Summer Colloquium 2014 faculty member Paul Weber on the publication of Part 1 of his essay, “Josef Gabriel Rheinberger and the Reform of Catholic Church Music,” in the October 2014 issue of The American Organist. It is a fascinating portrait of both the composer and the state of 19th century church music.

Those of you who have subscriptions to the American Guild of Organists’ journal are encouraged to head for page 48.  If you’re not an AGO member, look for the journal at the local public or university library.

I felt infinitely smarter after reading this and can hardly wait for Part 2.

Bravo, Paul!